Astypalea

Ferry tickets to Astypalea

Astypalea looks like a typical Cycladic island, but actually belongs to the Dodecanese. Looking on the map, you’ll notice that the island has the shape of a butterfly bridging the two island complexes. For an alternative holiday experience, look no further. Ιf you methodically avoid mass tourism, you’ll never want to leave Astypalea, or at least you’ll certainly come back.

  • BOOK YOUR FERRY TICKETS
  • RETURN TRIP
  • SINGLE ROUTE
  • MULTIPLE ROUTES
  • We have not been able to identify the port
  • We have not been able to identify the port
Up to 9 passengers
Up to 4 vehicles You have reached the maximun allowed vehicles
When and where are you travelling?
  • We have not been able to identify the port
  • We have not been able to identify the port
Up to 9 passengers
Up to 4 vehicles You have reached the maximun allowed vehicles
When and where are you travelling?
  • We have not been able to identify the port
  • We have not been able to identify the port
Up to 9 passengers
Up to 4 vehicles You have reached the maximun allowed vehicles
When and where are you travelling?
  • We have not been able to identify the port
  • We have not been able to identify the port
Up to 9 passengers
Up to 4 vehicles You have reached the maximun allowed vehicles
When and where are you travelling?
Previous search: {{ model.route.Origin.Text }} {{ model.route.Destination.Text }} {{ dates }} {{ model.passengers.Passengers }} {{ model.passengers.Vehicles }}

Astypalaia, the white nymph of the Dodecanese

You can think of the island of Astypalea as a pop of crisp white color amidst the blue of Aegean Sea right where the Dodecanese and the Cyclades meet. By boat, it takes a bit longer to get to from the port of Piraeus, but the beauty of the island is sure to make up for every single hour you’ll spend on the ferry.

Beach in Astypalea
So, book your ferry tickets to Astypalea through Let’s Ferry, and make your trip there easy and affordable!

Worth visiting:
Chora, the capital town of the island (also called "Astropalia"). The main port of the island overlooks the Aegean and features beautiful whitewashed houses, mansions with intricate cornices, ever-blossoming bougainvillea and hospitable locals.
Astypalea view
The Venetian Guerini Castle, dating back to the 13th century, and the churches of St. George Glykavlis and Panagia of the Castle with its ornate bell towers. Visit the castle on a day when the wind is not strong. Take pictures; make memories!
The uninhabited nearby islets of Kounoupa and Koutsomiti. Hop on a day boat trip from Pera Gialos and discover a “two-in-one” beach in a Castaway-resembling setting.
Get the fastest routes and the cheapest ferry tickets to Astypalea at letsferry.com. You can also enjoy multiple-destination booking and try out some Greek island hopping. Who knows? It may rock your boat!

Worth experiencing:
Rock Climbing on limestone rocks found in Ftera. There are two routes you can choose from, depending on the level of difficulty.

Rock climbing in Astypalea
Speleological Tourism. Discover the Cave of Negros with its impressive stalactites, Drakos Cave and the Cave of Panagia Poulariani, known for its unique shape (all open to public).

Drakos Cave in Astypalea
Hiking. Thanks to its special geomorphology, Astypalea offers two separate paths. We recommend taking the hiking trail that starts from Livadi - on the west side of the island – and leads to the beach of Ai Giannis, from where you can come back to town by boat (you would need to arrange for a local boat to pick you up from there). Added bonus: you may see some dolphins following your boat!

Hiking in Astypalea
Tip: Don’t forget to try the local delicacies, such as the Lasanakia, filled with mizithra cheese (the locals call it chloro) and the saffron of the island (zafora). Feel like trying them? Your ferry tickets to Astypalea, the butterfly-shaped island of the Aegean, are just one click away.

Beach in Astypalea

Information about the port of Astypalea

Astypalea is connected four times a week in summer to Piraeus via Naxos and Paros. A ferry based in Kalymnos, runs thrice weekly, linking the island with Kalymnos and islands further north in the Dodecanese.